1 hour ago | 5,304 notes | via loquamani | from fhlorere

(Source: fhlorere)



4 hours ago | 212 notes | via lifeinpoetry | from lifeinpoetry

Attention to health is life’s greatest hindrance.
— Plato (427-347 B.C.)

Plato was a bore.
— Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)

Nietzsche was stupid and abnormal.
— Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)

I’m not going to get into the ring with Tolstoy.
— Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961)

Hemingway was a jerk.
— Harold Robbins (1916-1997)

by (via lifeinpoetry)


4 hours ago | 480 notes | via just-yasmeen | from niadil
We cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are.
by (via http://ift.tt/1suShZy)

(Source: niadil)



4 hours ago | 42,175 notes | via likeloveadore | from vouguez

(Source: vouguez)



4 hours ago | 247 notes | via 365daysofhalloween | from starrydiadems
starrydiadems:

From North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell (1855).

starrydiadems:

From North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell (1855).



4 hours ago | 62,378 notes | via nerdyirishfeminist | from itsstuckyinmyhead

thatstheriddle:

introspection-luck-and-talent:

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Tumblr Teaches History

I reblog this for the anon who once sent me an ask telling me there was no such thing as a history fandom on tumblr.

Hi-hi-historical jokes.



2 days ago | 117 notes | via the-library-and-step-on-it | from thenarratologist
thenarratologist:

LITERARY THEORY: “Death of the Author” (1986) by Roland Barthes
This is one of those texts that are absolutely inescapable for literature students. Wherever you live, whichever classes you choose, at one point in your academic career you will encounter Roland Barthes’ “Death of the Author.” Whether you agree with him or not, Barthes introduced a concept that was truly revolutionary and is still a game-changing read for many first- and second-year literature students to this day.
So let’s blow some minds.
Read More

thenarratologist:

LITERARY THEORY: “Death of the Author” (1986) by Roland Barthes

This is one of those texts that are absolutely inescapable for literature students. Wherever you live, whichever classes you choose, at one point in your academic career you will encounter Roland Barthes’ “Death of the Author.” Whether you agree with him or not, Barthes introduced a concept that was truly revolutionary and is still a game-changing read for many first- and second-year literature students to this day.

So let’s blow some minds.

Read More



3 days ago | 190 notes | via thedebonscaregentlequeer | from wertheyouth
A librarian is like a bartender, directing people to what they might like to try
by Anne, librarian (via wertheyouth)


3 days ago | 17,477 notes | via avant-gardenhead | from splitterherzen
People are rivers, always ready to move from one state of being into another. It is not fair, to treat people as if they are finished beings. Everyone is always becoming and unbecoming.
by Kathleen Winter, Annabel  (via silentnostalgia)

(Source: splitterherzen)



3 days ago | 1,590 notes | via thedeerandtheoak | from indigenousdialogues

indigenousdialogues:

Photography project entitled Eyes as Big as Plates (Norway and Finland) by © Karoline Hjorth & Riitta Ikonen.



3 days ago | 567 notes | via lifeinpoetry | from rhapsodoi
rhapsodoi:

from eurydice - h.d. (x)

rhapsodoi:

from eurydice - h.d. (x)



4 days ago | 4,531 notes | via just-yasmeen | from workingoutisthenewsexy

(Source: workingoutisthenewsexy)



4 days ago | 14,169 notes | via thedebonscaregentlequeer | from hallowkind

tresas:

please stress the importance of platonic love

(Source: hallowkind)